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Gyalwang drukpa nuns sexual misconduct

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The chant of monks in a centuries-old monastery can be heard in the distance.

The famed “kung fu nuns”...

Villagers slowly emerge from whitewashed stone cottages to tend to their wheat and barley fields, and ready their goats to search for pasture.

Until, that is, you hear the energetic yells of scores of young women, clad in sweatpants and trainers. Fanned out in front of a majestic white temple-like structure, they stretch, lunge, jump, kick and punch on the orders of nuns.

Meet the Kung Fu nuns - women from an age-old Buddhist sect who are using their martial arts expertise to challenge gender roles in this conservative culture and teach women self-defense, as reports of rapes rise in India. Unlike other nuns, their chants and prayers are followed by jabs and thrust kicks. Between meditation sessions, they attend gender equality lessons. Even their traditional maroon robes are periodically swapped for martial arts attire, with black belts. If we act, people will think if: Wangchuk is one of around nuns globally who belong to the Drukpa lineage - the only female order in the patriarchal Buddhist monastic system where nuns have equal status to monks.

Traditionally, nuns are expected to cook and clean and are not permitted to exercise. But this changed almost a decade ago when the leader of the 1,year-old sect, His Holiness The Gyalwang Drukpa, encouraged the nuns to Gyalwang drukpa nuns sexual misconduct Kung Fu.

Nuns share their skills in...

Inspired by his mother to advocate for gender equality, he also gave the nuns leadership roles and helped them study beyond Buddhist teachings to become electricians and plumbers. The nuns are active in the communities where they live, mainly in Nepal and India, treating sick animals and organizing eye care camps for villagers.

They trek and cycle thousands of kilometers through Himalayan mountain Gyalwang drukpa nuns sexual misconduct to raise awareness on issues ranging from pollution to human trafficking. Following a massive earthquake in April in Nepal, they refused to leave but trekked to villages to remove rubble, clear pathways and distribute food to survivors.

Carrie Lee, president of Live to Love International, a charity which works with the Drukpa nuns to support marginalized Himalayan communities, says they are exceptional role models.

Not even earthquakes, avalanches, monsoons and cloudbursts can stand in their way.

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